Revisiting virtual desktops for Windows

It must be something about the slightly warmer air in Spring time because the last time I looked at virtual desktops for Windows was almost exactly two years ago.

Back then I tried an app called Desktops and mentioned VirtuaWin in passing but I honestly don’t remember why I stopped using Desktops and barely remember using it at all.

I installed VirtuaWin last Friday and I’ve been using it over the weekend and it’s a fine replacement for the same Linux functionality I used for many years. I have browsers in desktop 1, MTPuTTy in desktop 2 and I’m experimenting with xchat and Skype in desktop 3 so if you ping me on either of those and I don’t react it’s probably because the status bar icon doesn’t flash.

There’s also Dexpot but I’m in no hurry to try it just yet.


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3 thoughts on “Revisiting virtual desktops for Windows


  1. I can’t remember why but I switched from VirtuaWin to Dexpot quite a while ago and was happy with the move. Combined with WinSplit Revolution it works very well.

    That said I’m now on Ubuntu for dev work and much happier about the workspace implementation.


    1. Alex, you left a comment on my last post too in 2012!

      I’d move back to Linux in a heartbeat but for two things – Steam games (less of an issue now but still..) and Lightroom. Plus I have a Backblaze account now backing everything up on my Windows machine.

      Maybe I should put Linux on that Mac Air… ;)


      1. Ha! I completely forgot I left that comment – practically saying the same thing except for the Ubuntu end of things.

        I’m currently dual-booting. I haven’t quite finalised my setup but the core split is:

        * Ubuntu: Work
        * Windows: Music production and photo processing

        The plan is that a single CrashPlan account, active on the Linux install, will backup everything in both Linux and Windows. Windows will be left unencrypted as it’s only personal stuff on there, but Linux home partition (containing work stuff) will be fully encrypted.

        Yes, it’s a bit more work maintaining two installs, but it will allow me to run an uber minimal Windows install to ensure few background procs interfering with music production performance.

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