The real Batmobile

Great article about the Batmobile!
Did anyone else see bits of Chicago in the film? I remember an aerial view of the Wrigley Building and North Bridge, and I could almost swear that the blur of American flags in one chase scene may have been the flags outside Marshall Fields on State Street!

Linux Raw Image Management

I’ve steered clear of RAW photography for some time. Maybe it’s the extra few steps required to get a finished product, or the very large file size, or just that “it’s not jpeg!”
I changed the quality mode on my 20D to RAW this afternoon and was shocked when it told me that I could only take 79 shots! *gulp*
I fired off a shot, of an old Honda parked in front of my car and as I was in a hurry, forgot to do any more.
Later on I went searching and found a number of sites:

  • Raw Digital Photo Decoding in Linux – Dave Coffin’s dcraw seems to be the basic library that everyone else builds their GUI tools on. He went to the trouble of decoding the various RAW formats in existance.
  • Nikon D70 under Linux – plenty to read here, including a section on noise removal and links to a few GIMP noise removal plugins I must try out!
  • RawPhoto – the author says it’s beta quality code, but it works. I haven’t tried it yet however.
  • UFRaw – you can install this in Debian with apt-get install gimp-ufraw. I tried it. It works, now I have to read the user-manual to figure out what all those controls mean!

I’d post an example RAW photo but the only one I have is nothing to write home about so you’ll just have to wait in line like everyone else!

T-Engine: Ubiquitous Computing

That T-Engine sounds mad! Computers everywhere talking to each other!
I could bring home my camera after a hard day taking shots only to have the photos transfer by wireless comms to my desktop PC when I drop my bag next to my desk!
When I’ve been working too long at my PC it could order the kettle downstairs to turn on and then chime a bell when the tea’s made!
Ah yes, interesting times ahead!
The slashdot discussion has a few more bits, including a better explanation of why i-Tron is better than past attempts at ubiquitous computing.