I always thought flossing was good for my teeth

This SBM article leads me to question the idea that flossing my teeth helps to prevent dental cavities and gum disease.

It’s more complicated than that.

Done “by professionals” it can reduce dental caries (tooth decay) but if you’re not flossing at least five times a week there’s little benefit to it. Maybe the professionals had a technique the rest of us don’t know, or perhaps they were more diligent about flossing during those trials. Who knows?

To floss, or not to floss? That is the question. Now that you are armed with the evidence, you can make the choice which is best for you. If you want to prevent tooth decay, you should focus on reducing your sugar intake, use a fluoridated toothpaste, and perhaps a fluoride mouth rinse. Whether you decide to floss or not depends on your desired outcome. For a fresh, debris-free mouth, yes, go ahead and floss away. If your desire is to prevent cavities or periodontitis, other methods are more effective.

Many years ago before I started flossing regularly I rushed to the dentist while on holiday with a terrible pain in my mouth. Fearing that a tooth would have to be pulled or cavity filled I sat in the chair, leaned back and the dentist took one look. He grabbed some floss and removed the crumb that had lodged between my teeth. The pain was gone!

So, just like the author of that article, Grant Ritchey, I’ll continue to floss every night. There’s no downside and my mouth feels better for it, even if the science doesn’t fully back me up on this.

Onism: how much of the world have you seen?

onism – n. the frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time, which is like standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange place names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die-and all because, as the arrow on the map helpfully points out, you are here.

Ironically due to our connected world we’re all the more aware of the blank spots in our maps.

The Web Won’t Forget Alex King

If you use a WordPress site, either as a visitor or owner, you’re using code that Alex King, one of the original developers of WordPress, worked on.

He passed away after fighting cancer for 2 years but his online presence lives on in the form of his blog with it’s deep archive of posts going back years, and in so much code that it’s humbling to look at his projects page. Looking through the svn log of WordPress trunk shows he still had a hand in helping the WordPress project until relatively recently:

trunk$ svn log|grep alexkingorg
props alexkingorg for the initial, long-suffering patch.
props alexkingorg. fixes #24162.
Props alexkingorg
`wp.media` instead of just `media`. props alexkingorg, see #22676.
Add $post_ID context to the pre_ping filter. props alexkingorg, devesine. fixes #18506.
Add filter so the users can select custom image sizes added by themes and plugins, props alexkingorg, fixes #18520
esc_textarea() and application for obvious textarea escaping. props alexkingorg. fixes #15454
Escape links by default. Props alexkingorg. see #13051
Safely include class-json.php, class-simplepie.php and class-snoopy.php, props alexkingorg, fixes #11827
Fix user creation from admin after changes for #10751. Fixes #10811 props alexkingorg.
Hooks needed to allow alternate category admin inteface. Props alexkingorg. fixes #3408
Wrap cat name in CDATA. props alexkingorg. fixes #3252

I’m sorry I never met Alex, however I remember working virtually with him and Adam Tow on AllThingsD which seems like a lifetime away now. Adam has a great article on Alex on his blog, as does Matt who went into detail about Alex’s involvement with WordPress going back to the days of b2. I had completely forgotten the CSS competition he mentioned!

Alex, your legacy lives on.